Thursday, August 17, 2017

The Excavation of Tutter's Neck #virginiapioneersnet

The Excavation of Tutter's Neck

Tutter's NeckThe Tutter's Neck excavations represented the partial exploration of a small colonial dwelling and outbuilding, both of which ceased to exist by about 1750. On the basis of the excavated artifacts the intensity of occupation seems to fall into two periods, the decade of about 1701 to 1710 and within the years about 1730 to 1740. Documentary evidence indicates that these periods relate to the respective ownerships of Frederick Jones and Thomas Bray (lived at Littletown).
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Thursday, August 10, 2017

Map of New Town Excavation #virginiapioneersnet


New Town Excavation Map

New Town

It was the desire of the Virginia Company of London to build towns in Virginia which would possess a convenient and suitable number of houses, constructed together of brick and encircled by a battlemented brick wall. Exactly in the same way Cecilius Calvert, Lord Baltimore, commanded the first Maryland settlers to lay out row houses in that first settlement. The excavations of Jamestown have borne out the fact that the typical city building was usually a row affair. However, the several rural homes within the city limits could not be classified as "town" houses. There are at least five groups of row houses known at Jamestown, and there are even stock sizes for such groups. Twenty feet by forty, measured on the inside of the walls, were the most common dimensions, inherited from the British medieval building laws. 
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Thursday, August 3, 2017

The Excavation of the Bin House #virginiapioneersnet

The Excavation of the Bin House

bin houseparlor and great hallThe foundation of the "Bin House" at Jamestown, excavated by the National Park Service. The two brick bins have concave floors below the original main floor level. There were a number of dwellings, including spinning houses, smithies, tan houses, bin houses, well houses, hogsties, cornhouses, and guest houses. For the gardens, sometimes called "hortyards," there were summerhouses, greenhouses, and arbors. Then there were bloomeries and ironworks, wharves for landing goods, called &qupt;bridges," warehouses, windmills, watermills, sawmills, glassworks, silkhouses, brick and pottery kilns, lime kilns, saltworks, and blockhouses. 

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Tuesday, August 1, 2017

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Thursday, July 27, 2017

The Parlor House in Jamestown #virginiapioneersnet

The Parlor House

Hall and Parlor HouseThe "Warburton House" or "Pinewoods" of about 1680 has segmental-arched openings, T-chimneys, and chimney caps with mouse-tooth brickwork, a decoration which was fashional during the 17th century. An earlier structure also had a rear wing. The parlor and hall was probably added after the planter or tradesman had been in the colony for awhile and was more prosperous. It was a simple matter to add a "parlor" to one end of the homestead, thus making the second stage of development, the "hall-and-parlor" dwelling. In some instances, the parlor was smaller than the hall or Great Room. 
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Wednesday, July 26, 2017

Home of the First Royal Governor of Virginia

"Green Spring" Plantation 

Governor William BerkeleyThe home of Governor William Berkeley was known as Green Spring and the manor house was divided into six apartments. As Royal Governor, Sir William was granted 984 acres of land designated "by name of Green Spring" in June 1643. in Jamestown, Virginia. By the 1660's, the total property's size had increased to 2,090 acres. The house and estate were named for a mossy spring which a visitor in the 1680's described as "so very cold that 'twas dangerous drinking the water thereof in Summer-time." An additional 3,000-acre tract bordering the western boundary of Green Spring was set aside as "Governor's land" and was for the use of Berkeley while he remained in office. Source: Records of York County, vol. 1638-1648, p. 218.  Jamestown, Virginia

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Tuesday, July 25, 2017

Getting Help with Colonial Handwriting #virginiapioneersnet #genealogy

 Need some help reading Colonial Handwriting. 17th and 18th century court house records are quite difficult to read.  Yet the old deeds, wills and estates contain the answer to your genealogy.  Use this script decoder to help.



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