Thursday, September 14, 2017

Causey's Care #irginiapioneersnet

Causey's Care (pronounced Cleare) 

Because of the lost records of James City County, genealogists are constantly researching around that country endeavering to learn more about its first settlers. Nathaniel Causey was an old soldier who came to Virginia in the first Supply vessel early in 1608. It was on December 10, 1620 that he obtained a land grant which he started developing as a private plantation. From all indications, that plantation was located to the east of West and Shirley Hundred on the north side of the James River. During the year of 1624 Causey sat on the Assembly, presumably represeing Jordan's Journey where his residence was listed. He was among the 31 who signed the Assembly's reply to the declaration of charges against the Smith administration of the Colony made by Alderman Johnson and others. His plantation, Causey's Care was across the river from Jordan's Journey and for years served as a landmark of the vicinity. Causey appears occasionally in the court records as when on May 23, 1625, he assumed a debt and obligation to "Doctor Pott" which required the delivery of "one barrel of Indian corne" to "James Cittie at the first cominge downe of the next boate." Another land entry appears on May of 1625 for 200 acres of land. At the time, his wife was Thomasine who had also come to the in 1609 where she resided without about five servants. However, the Indian massacre of 1622 changed the lives of the early settlers rather dramatically. Causey was reported as being " cruelly wounded, and the salvages about him, with an axe did cleave one of their heads, whereby the rest fled and he escaped." s
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Thursday, September 7, 2017

The Littletown Plantation in Jamestown #virginiapionoeersnet

Littletown Plantation 

LittletonAnyone who is familiar with Virginia wills, estates and deed records has seen the name of George Menefie in many documents. He appears to have been the wealthiest colonist in the early days, owning a 1200-acre plantation near Jamestown. He received the land grant when he transported 24 immigrants into the colony and later patented another 3000 acres for paying the passage of 60 individuals. In March 1633, Dutch trader David DeVies observed that the two-acre garden of Menefie was "full of Provence roses, apple, pear and cherry trees, with different kinds of sweet-smelling herbs, such as rosemary, sage, marjoram, thyme." Richard Kemp later acquired the tract and called it Rich Neck. Rich Neck was located in the Middle Plantation between the York and James Rivers. According to the Digital Arcaelogical Archive of Comparative Slavery, the plantation was located in Williamsburg. Kemp owned the land until 1650 when he died and left the estate to his wife. However, the wife remarried Sir Thomas Lunsford who gained the property three years later upon her death. 
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Thursday, August 31, 2017

What is a Magazine Ship? #virginiapioneersnet



What is a Magazine Ship? 

Magazine Ships

The magazine is the name of a place where ammunition is stored on board a vessel and included explosive materials. The London Company was quite strict in the weapons sent to the colony and the affairs of the magazine were administered by a director who was assisted by a committee of five counselors. One the cargo was received into the colony, the accounts thereof were required to be passed upon by a team of auditors specially nominated in a Quarter Court. Thus, the weapons received into the colony for defensive maneuvers were carefully guarded as they were sorely needed by the colonists as a defense against a huge population of marauding Indian tribes in the region. This means that the adventurers held separate meetings to conduct all routine business affairs. During the settlement of Jamestown, no outside trader was permitted to ship supplies into the Colony. The first vessels were referred to as Supply ships because they transported supplies into the Colony as well as a those passengers proposing to reside in Virginia. Fevers, dysentery and Indian attacks were a way of life and restricted the settlers to reside within the confines of a palisade fence. The first ten years or so, a number of Supply ships arrived in the colony and it was not uncommon for the settlers to assume the return voyage to England in search of a new wife to replace the one which had died. After the year of 1619, the vessel which conveyed articles and supplies into the Jamestown settlement were called a magazine ships. The articles purchased by the adventurers who entered into a joint stock (known as the magazine) were conveyed by the magazine ship to the New World. Also, its cargo was confined to necessities. Several immigrants were appointed to take charge of the goods both before and after the vessel arrived in Jamestown. The first magazine vessel was called the Susan, a small vessel whose cargo was restricted only to that clothing which the Colonists needed the most. The goods of the Susan were placed in the care of Abraham Piersey as the Cape Merchant, both during the voyage and after Virginia was reached. As the struggling colonists commenced their chores, the only commodities produced were those which assured a profit when sold in England, such as tobacco and sassafras. The exported cargo was then exchanged for the contents of the arriving magazine ship.


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Thursday, August 24, 2017

The First State House in Jamestown #virginiapioneersnet

The First State House

First State HouseThere is the group of three brick edifices which comprised the "First State House" in Virginia. The three cellars and their long walls were excavated. The structure was originally two storeys and garret high. The down-river, or eastern section, and the central portion, were erected about 1635 by Governor John Harvey and were used as the capitol building of the Colony from 1641 for fifteen years. The up-river section was built before 1655 by Sir William Berkeley. But by 1670 the whole pile, with its three front gables facing the James River was burned during the Rebellion of Nathaniel Bacon against the Royal Governor. The unit floor plan comprised a hall and parlor with back-to-back fireplaces and a very narrow passageway running the length of the building on one side. It was quite similar to the typical London city house, Tudor in appearance with wrought-iron hardware. Such items as Cock's Head hinges, leaded lattice casements, and great rim locks with eight-inch keys were dug up.


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Wednesday, August 23, 2017

Why Searching Tithables is Valuable to Genealogists #virginiapioneersnet #genealogy

VirginiaPioneers.net has just added images of wills and estates in Accomack County, Virginia, 1671 to 1737.  Also, marriage bonds and licenses 1784 to 1798. And Tithables 1674 to 1694. The reason to search Tithables is because in colonial Virginia the General Assembly collected a poll tax on all free males, servants and slaves. The information in those records help to affirm the presence of your ancestors and the numbers of persons in his family. To see a list of other Virginia records please go to Virginia Pioneers





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Thursday, August 17, 2017

The Excavation of Tutter's Neck #virginiapioneersnet

The Excavation of Tutter's Neck

Tutter's NeckThe Tutter's Neck excavations represented the partial exploration of a small colonial dwelling and outbuilding, both of which ceased to exist by about 1750. On the basis of the excavated artifacts the intensity of occupation seems to fall into two periods, the decade of about 1701 to 1710 and within the years about 1730 to 1740. Documentary evidence indicates that these periods relate to the respective ownerships of Frederick Jones and Thomas Bray (lived at Littletown).
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Thursday, August 10, 2017

Map of New Town Excavation #virginiapioneersnet


New Town Excavation Map

New Town

It was the desire of the Virginia Company of London to build towns in Virginia which would possess a convenient and suitable number of houses, constructed together of brick and encircled by a battlemented brick wall. Exactly in the same way Cecilius Calvert, Lord Baltimore, commanded the first Maryland settlers to lay out row houses in that first settlement. The excavations of Jamestown have borne out the fact that the typical city building was usually a row affair. However, the several rural homes within the city limits could not be classified as "town" houses. There are at least five groups of row houses known at Jamestown, and there are even stock sizes for such groups. Twenty feet by forty, measured on the inside of the walls, were the most common dimensions, inherited from the British medieval building laws. 
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