Wednesday, June 28, 2017

English Traders in Virginia during 1647 #virginiapioneersnet #genealogy

During 1647 there were a Number of English Traders who Resided in the Colony 

Colonial Trading Path

The English traders who resided in the Colony were Francis Lee, John Chew, Thomas Burbage, Robert Vaulx and John Greene. In some instances, they returned to England (Robert Vaulx, John Greene, Francis Lee). The participation in commercial exchange with the Virginians does not appear to have been the direct means of acquiring vast fortunes on the part of the merchants who resided in the mother country, although it is known that many persons engaged in this trade were men of affluent circumstances. Lee, towards the latter part of the century, referred to himself as "of London, formerly of Virginia." Source: Records of York Company, vol. 1684-1687, p. 163; Rappahannock Records, vol. 1663-1668 (concerning Greene); Records of Middlesex County, vol. 1673-1685, p. 103. 

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Thursday, June 22, 2017

Settlers to Jamestown Purchased Wives #virginiapioneersnet

Settlers to Jamestown Purchased Wives 

Buying WivesBecause of the hardships endured in the early settlement of James Town, one of the things permitted by the London Company was the purchasing of wives. In tracing these families, I have discovered a number of persons, before and after the 1622 massacre particularly, who returned to London to acquire a wife. First, disease and rat poison from the vessels caused a rank loss of life and the later massacre, of course, killed off a number of families. The London Company investors added this provision to their charter. Nearly 400 persons were lain in the colony on March 22, 1622. 

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Monday, January 30, 2017

Ships Lost at Sea


Ships Lost at Sea

sunken shipFor 169 years vessels crossed the Atlantic into the American colonies. The adventure cost numerous lives and property and vessels went down in storms and were caught on sand bars. Some vessels bound for Virginia, for example, found it necessary to unload their cargo in the ports of New England. When General Oglethorpe engaged the first vessel to the Colony of Georgia, the captain refused to go any further south than Port Royal. Hence, its passengers had to travel by foot into Georgia. Only today through the use of sonar equipment are we realizing that thousands of vessels sank in the shipping lanes traveling their routes from Europe and the West Indies to the American ports. An examination of the deed records of Sunbury, Georgia in Liberty County reveals contracts between ship captains and colonists. The content usually specifies that if the goods do not arrive by a date certain, or if the cargo is spoilt, that the captain will not be paid. There is good reason, because the seas were frought with storms, hurricanes and sandbars. As one studies these deeds, it is quite obvious that deliveries were not always made in a timely fashion which prompted the captain to bring an offical complaint. Ultimately, the resort town of Sunbury was destroyed by a hurricane about 1800. A visit to the site is laughable. It is privately owned today and one cannot help but wonder how this remotely situated site between Charleston and Savannah housed more than 400 homes and a thriving economy. Yet the records reflect that it did. The loss of thousands of vessels during the colonial years means that the ships manifest and passenger lists also sank. This means that the collection of Immigration records at the National Archives is but a small percentage of a truer picture and it serves to emphasize the need to examine more closely "all surviving" county records from the earliest times. All of Charleston, South Carolina records are in tact, including affidavits and deeds pertaining to the affairs of the colonists. Although it is difficult to read 17th and 18th century documents, it is quite necessary, if ever we are to get to comprehend the whole picture and trace further back on the ancestors. The growing collection of Pioneer Families affords the genealogist images of actual documents, such as wills, estates, marriages, deeds, etc. A subscription is offered under 8 Genealogy Websites and includes:

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Saturday, January 21, 2017

A Good Deal for Genealogists


A Good Deal for Bloggers if you Act Now - Get More Genealogy Real Estate for the Money.

We are notifying all subscribers of this blog that we have a few slots open for 18-month subscriptions to 8 Genealogy
Websites (instead of 12 months). This includes genealogy databases in AL, GA, NC, SC, KY, VA, TN

If you are planning on joining, now is a good time.  These slots will not last long as you get 18 months instead of 
12 for the same rate.  Spaces will close as soon as they are filled so please act now.  18-months subscription

Your password will be sent after the receipt.

Jeannette Austin

Saturday, October 22, 2016

The Typical Hall and Parlor House in Jamestown


Hall and Parlor House
Hall and Parlor House

The "Warburton House" or "Pinewoods" of about 1680 has segmental-arched openings, T-chimneys, and chimney caps with mouse-tooth brickwork, a decoration which was fashionable during the 17th century. An earlier structure also had a rear wing. The parlor and hall was probably added after the planter or tradesman had been in the colony for awhile and was more prosperous. It was a simple matter to add a "parlor" to one end of the homestead, thus making the second stage of development, the "hall-and-parlor" dwelling. In some instances, the parlor was smaller than the hall or Great Room.

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Friday, September 30, 2016

More Genealogy Records Added #virginiapioneers.net

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Lots of new records added to AL, TN, NC, KY, VA and GA!
Details www.georgiapioneers.com/subscribe/subscribe.html


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Saturday, July 30, 2016

Factoring Agents for Colonials

The Job of the Factoring Agent
By Jeannette Holland Austin

A factor is an agent who transacts business for another. In colonial days there were tobacco and cotton factors. In other words, shipping tobacco to England, the West Indies or elsewhere, required an agent to sell the crops and handle the business transactions. In 1672, one of the factors of George Lee, an English merchant, died in Virginia. At the time he was indebted to his principal for 700 pounds sterling. His property was passed into the hands of his mother who appointed an attorney to take charge of it. The whole estate was converted into tobacco, a crop which he was about to ship to his own consignee in England. The General Court interposed with an order requiring him to transfer the entire quantity to a third person in the mother country until the justice of the claim of Lee onn the property of his deceased agent had been decided. Also, all of his account books went back to England. As was the common practice, widows had plenty of suitors owing to a shortage of females in the Virginia colony. This is how the goods of an estate went into the hands of the second husband who very often showed no scruple in dealing with them as his personal property. Such was the case of Thomas Kingston, the agent of Thomas Cowell who owned a plantation in the colony about 1636. Upon the death of Kingston, his relict became the wife of Thomas Loving who appropriated the credits and merchandise of Cowell. Cowell petitioned that Loving be required to take an inventory of the property in his possession and to give bond in a large sum to hold it without further purloining it.
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Factoring Agents in the Olden Days
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