Thursday, April 5, 2018

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Will you Allow AI to Construct your Genealogy?



Photo credited to Dezeen.com
Imagine yourself instructing your computer to assemble a pedigree chart based on the information you provide. As AI draws upon information across thousands of genealogy platforms and assembles the data, would you trust the results?  If IT had access to all of the world's genealogy records, it would probably deliver a fairly accurate genealogy.  The brick walls and suppositions in our work would be analyzed from a mathematical standpoint. Let us face the fact that math is a true science.  I can imagine that when AT hit the brick walls, that he would provide us with a logical choice of the data. Our decision, then, would culminate from the mathematical prowness of a computer. But what about the tidbits of data stored inside our own brain, a sort of family knowledge?  Aunt May always said that our family came to America from Germany, for one example.  There are countless others couched inside of our own brain, not that of IT.

The fastest computer in the world uses about 40,000 processors with 260 cores each. That is more than 10 million processing cores running in parallel. Although each of these cores has less power than the intel processor on your desktop, the entire machine delivers about the same power as the human brain. Interesting. Nevertheless, that does not mean that AI is ready for big things such as robot control. Far from it.  This massively parallel architecture still presents enormous programming challenges in all of the processes powered together. The growth of the IT industry demands the use of custom microchips, more parallelism, more sophistocated software, and even the possibility of entirely new ways of doing computing.  for more articles, Join the Genealogy History Blog





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Thursday, February 22, 2018

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Genealogy History Blog 

An invitation to join the "Genealogy History" blog which offers daily articles concerning tracing families from foreign shores and throughout America.  Also, some interesting articles on historical events and how our ancestors are connected by genealogical research.  

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Monday, November 6, 2017

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Thursday, October 12, 2017

The Creation of Jamestown #virginiapioneersnet


Map of JamestownJJames City County was created in 1634 as James City Shire by order of King Charles I. The county seat is Williamsburg which was first settled in 1607 by English colonists. Jamestown, which evolved into James City County, was named for King James I. When King James revoked the charter of the London Company in 1624, Virginia became the first royal colony of the king. By 1634, the colony divided into eight counties, among them were James City and the Charles River, now known as York. The division into counties laid the foundation for strong local government that later served as a model to states as they were admitted into the union. Every year until 1632, the Assembly met at the Jamestown church. The Assembly is believed to have met in the home of the governor until about 1699 when the capital was moved inland to Middle Plantation, which was renamed Williamsburg. Moving the county seat was unpopular with local residents, however in 1715 it was was moved from Jamestown to Williamsburg. Some very historical events occurred in Jamestown. For one thing, the rebellion of Nathaniel Bacon and his followers in an effort to get the governor to prevent Indian raids and massacres, burned Jamestown. 

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Thursday, October 5, 2017

"Green Spring" Plantation #virginiapioneersnet

"Green Spring" Plantation 

Governor William BerkeleyThe home of Governor William Berkeley was known as Green Spring and the manor house was divided into six apartments. As Royal Governor, Sir William was granted 984 acres of land designated "by name of Green Spring" in June 1643. in Jamestown, Virginia. By the 1660's, the total property's size had increased to 2,090 acres. The house and estate were named for a mossy spring which a visitor in the 1680's described as "so very cold that 'twas dangerous drinking the water thereof in Summer-time." An additional 3,000-acre tract bordering the western boundary of Green Spring was set aside as "Governor's land" and was for the use of Berkeley while he remained in office. Source: Records of York County, vol. 1638-1648, p. 218. 
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Thursday, September 28, 2017

Markets and Fairs in the Virginia Colony #virginiapioneersnet

Markets and Fairs 

Norwich Market
1799 Norwick Market in England. In 1649, the local authorities decided to hold markets every week in Jamestown, which was one form of a familiar English fair. English fairs were the oldest of the trade institutions and were encouraged during an age when the population was sparse. People could come together from a distance and exchange their products. The Jamestown markets were restricted to Wednesdays and Saturdays of each week and the boundaries of a site were carefully laid off. The market place in Jamestown extended from the eastern side of the James River for two miles. Source: Hening's Statutes, vol. I, p. 362. 

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Thursday, September 21, 2017

Jamestown Colonists Slaughered by Indians #virginiapioneersnet

Jamestown Colonists Slaughtered by Indians in 1622/3 

Flax
Hardships in the Colony: Crop: A Field of Flax. More than 300 Englishmen, women and children died in the massacre of 1622. Effectually, their settlements were reduced to six or seven in number. The several children who survived the massacre had hidden themselves in the woods. A great hunger and hardship settled upon the English. The glass-making houses could no longer be built at Jamestown, and the iron works planned at Falling Creek after some ore was found on the ground, slipped into oblivion. King Charles, being informed of the slaughter and ruination of the colony sympathized and dissolved the Virginia Company in 1626. The result was that the country and government was reduced, and he appointed the governor and council himself, this time directing that all patents and processes to issue in his own name, and he would receive a quit-rent of two shillings for every hundred acres of land. He established a constitution to be by a governor, council and assembly for apportioning land and granting patents to particular adventurers. The libery of taking up land, and the ambition each man had of being lord of a vast, though unimproved territory, together with the advantage of the many rivers, which afford commodious roads for shipping at every man's door, made settlement of towns difficult. Source: The History of Virginia by Robert Beverley. 

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