Wednesday, August 8, 2018

James City County Virginia Genealogy Databases #virginiapioneersnet #vagenealogy

James City County Records available to members of Virginia Pioneers

  • 1607 Settlers of Jamestown(list of names)

Digital Images of Will Book No. 1, 1865 to 1887

Testators: Allen, William ;| Ashlock, Richard |Barnes, William H. | Bennett, Abel | Bragg, Hugh | Bratcliff, George | Browning, A. J. | Browning, Absalom, estate | Bush, William, estate | Canaday, Jonathan | Chapman, Aaron | Clowe, John, estate | Davis, Benjamin Allen | Debriss, William | Dibble, A. S. | Fielding, Jeremiah, estate | Fox, George W. | Hankins, George | Harrell, Burrell | Harris, Abby | Hazlewood, George | Henley, Thomas | Hinson, John | Hockaday, Susan | Hockaday, William, estate | Hubbard, Charles M. | Hubbard, William B., estate | Hundley, Judith | Hundley, Thomas | Jackson, John | Jones, Henley (trust) | Jones, John W. | Jones, William M. | Knight, Garrett | Marston, Dandridge | Merridith, John | Minor, William J. | Moore, Horace, estate | Moore, Moses | Morris, James S. | Mulford, Furman | Peggott, Nathaniel | Pierce, Elizabeth B. | Pitts, Simeon | Post, Christopher | Power, H. S. B. | Ratcliffe, John | Richardson, B. M., estate | Richardson, Elizabeth | Russell, Simon, estate | Scarborough, James | Slater, Beverly | Spencer, Martha | Stewart, George W., estate | Spraggins, S. B., estate | Taylor, Frances P. | Taylor, Mathew, estate | Taylor, P. A. | Taylor, Robert P. | Taylor, Thomas | Turner, Archer | Vaiden, Ann | Van Horne, Cornelius | Waller, Littleton | Wallis, Archer | Walls, William B. | Whitaker, R. H., estate | Wilbern, William | Wilkins, John W., ward | Wise, David, estate | Wynne, Thomas | Yerby, William, estate

Miscellaneous Documents

Broadribb, William, LWT, transcription
Madison, James, LWT (1812), transcription
Randolph, John (Sir) of Williamsburg, LWT (1735), transcription
Rolfe, Johis, LWT, transcription
Sherwood, William, LWT, transcription
Taliaferro, Richard, LWT, transcription

Miscellaneous

  • 1704 Quit Rent Rolls
Jamestown databases for genealogists




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Wednesday, August 1, 2018

Learn if your Virginia Ancestors Left a Will or Estate #virginiapioneersnet #vagenealogy

Learn if your Ancestors Left a Will in Virginia


Old Colonial Records, Wills, Estates
SAVE TIME!  Visit the link listed below to learn if any of your ancestors left wills or estates in Virginia 

Use this Virginia County Index to Find Ancestors







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Wednesday, July 25, 2018

Colonial Dress #virginiapioneersnet #vawills #vaestates #vamarriages #vagenealogy




Colonial Dress

colonialdressShoe buckles were worn manufactured of brass, steel or silver. The periwig was worn during the latter part of the 17th century. In 1689, William Byrd sent one of his wigs to his London merchant with instructions to have it altered. The covering of heads of men consisted of the monmouth cap, the felt, the beaver or caster and the sraw hat. The neck-cloth was of blue linen, calico dowlas, muslan or the finest holland. The band or falling collar was made either of linen omore...Clarke Co. VA Names of Ancestorsr lace. The material of the coat ranged from broadcloth, camlet, fustian drugget and serve to cotton, kersey, frieze, canvas and buckskin. In 1638 a pair of boots in Accomac were valued at forty pounds of tobacco.


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Monday, July 16, 2018

Hoskins Creek in Tappahannock #virginiapioneersnet #vagenealogy #vaancestors #vawills #vamarriages




Hoskins Creek in Tappahannock

Hoskins CreekTappahannock, the county seat, is the oldest town in Essex County, Virginia and is situated on the Rappahannock River. An interestint aspect of tracing ancestors is to locate and visit the actual site of old homes and beginnings. As we study the deed records, we can just about pinpoint the old home sites. This is important because it provides a grasp of the history of the area and the people who settled there. Reading the old wills and inventories of the county discloses facits of a shared farm economy which helped to feed the earliest settlers, as well as details of everyday living and possessions. We have Old Essex Co. Wills and Estates !


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Wednesday, July 11, 2018

Those who gave so Much for Freedom #vagenealogy #vaancestors #vawills #vaestates #vamarriages #virginiapioneersnet




Those Who Gave So Much for Freedom

The Virginia ConventionThe name of Reverend William Johnson of Albemarle County was listed among the signers of a petition to the Virginia Convention asking for Independence from England. The first Virginia Conventions were a series of five self-governing political meetings administering the legislative, executive and judicial functions of government. The House of Burgesses had been dissolved in 1774 by Royal Governor Lord Dunmore, and so the conventions served as a revolutionary provisional government until the Fifth Virginia Convention established a republic for the Commonwealth of Virginia in its Constitution of May 1776. Later, in Bedford County he appeared in Court on April 22, 1782 and proved that he had furnished the Convention with 396 pds. of beef for which he was allowed 10 pds. 5 shillings. After the war, he went to Tennessee where he died.  more - Albemarle Co. VA Ancestors



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Tuesday, July 3, 2018

Newgate Prisoners to Virginia #virginiapioneersnet #vagenealogy #vawills #vaestates #vamarriages




Newgate Prisoners Indentured Themselves as Servants to Settle in Virginia

Newgate PrisonEnglish residents who were unable to pay their debts usually ended up in prison, with no hope of release. It was the ultimate condemnation for poor people and generally accepted by society. James Edward Oglethorpe (before he colonized Georgia) was an avid supporter of prison reform, especially after an artist friend died in Newgate. The friend was a popular artist who lived large. Oglethorpe struggled to get him released, but the artist was put into a cell with a person having a contageous disease and the artist soon died. However, Oglethorpe made his views known by pushing pamphlets and articles in various London newspapers. Ultimately, prisoners were given the choice of indenturing themselves to American colonists. Peter Coffey was born in Ireland and was apparently one of the prisoners of debt in Newgate Prison given the choice of the prison cell or the opportunity to indenture himself in the colonies. He put himself in bondage to come to America in the ship Forward Galley. The voyage was made in October of 1730 and 18 years later after being released from service, he was granted 220 acres of land on Vaughans Creek.

more...Prince Edward Co. VA Ancestors



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Wednesday, June 27, 2018

The Hardships of our Fathers




The Hardships of our Fathers

Cold HarbourWhile researching my ancestors sometimes I am amazed at the hardships they bore or what happened to their good lives. Presently, there is a series of historical accounts of the monarchs of England on the television. It begins with Alfred the Great and goes through the current monarchy. Although it said nothing of my Holland ancestors, while watching, I realized that had John Holland, the Duke of Exeter, next-in-line for the throne after Richard I was defeated, then the Tudors would not have taken power and Henry VIII would not have ascended the throne and rid the country of the immensely political Catholic Church. The duke was the grandson of Joan Plantagenet who first married Sir Thomas de Holland, and later, the Black Prince. The Black Prince died early in life, and it was his son, Richard, who came to the throne. His two step-brothers, Thomas and John, were in the political arena. It was John Holland who supported the duke of Lancaster in his wars against the duke of York. He amassed great estates, Dartlington Manor in Essex, and was ultimately the Earl of Huntingdon and possessed the great Admiral Seal of England. When Richard met Edward IV on the battle field, John and Thomas Holland conspired to secure Richard's position. When more


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